Improving sleep
quality

At Sealy, we’re dedicated to improving the quality of sleep, that’s why we’ve carried out the world’s largest sleep report, to find out more about your sleep patterns, habits, quality and insomnia. We also wanted to find out how this was impacting your general health and lifestyle.

 

The Sealy Sleep Census is a survey of 11,000 people across Australia, the United Kingdom, South Africa, China and South Korea to explore ep patterns, habits, quality and insomnia.

 

Worryingly, our results show that around 75 per cent of Australians struggle to get to, or stay asleep at night.

While we know that there are many contributing factors to a poor night’s rest, including lack of support for your body as you sleep, our findings suggest that Aussies are in deep need of a technology detox to ensure that they achieve a decent night’s shut eye.

As you may already know, our team at Sealy works with the best experts in the industry to deliver a quality sleep experience and bring you the most innovative sleep products and news.

Dr. Amy Reynolds is a Researcher at CQUniversity. She explains why the nation’s sleep issues may be linked to our addiction to technology, as supported in the Sealy Sleep Census.

“A hormone called melatonin helps to prepare the body for sleep. Levels of melatonin rise in the evening before bed, but bright light can affect these rising levels. Technology can throw this off as the light sends the wrong cue to the brain – so, when we are wanting to sleep we are giving our brains a signal that we are awake. It could also be that when we are using technology to interact with others we are more alert and engaged, which could affect our ability to fall asleep quickly,” said Amy.

Image displaying process of hormone called melatonin
Sealy Sleep Census infographic
Girl lying down on Sealy posturepedic mattress having restful sleep